Government of India
Ministry of Railways
(Railway Board)

 

Indian Railways Vigilance Manual 2018

 

All modifications, circulars can be found on the webpage of Vigilance Directorate, Railway Board here

http://www.indianrailways.gov.in/railwayboard/view_section.jsp?lang=0&id=0,1,304,366,546,843

All CVC Circulars on Inquiry/disciplinary matters

http://www.cvc.nic.in/notification/Inquiry-disciplinary-matters

 

 

 

Table of Contents. i

MESSAGE.. vi

FOREWORD.. vii

PREFACE.. viii

Disclaimer.. x

CHAPTER I RAILWAY VIGILANCE ORGANIZATION AND ITS ROLE.. 1

101             INTRODUCTION.. 1

102             EVOLUTION OF THE VIGILANCE ORGANIZATION.. 1

103             PRESENT STRUCTURE OF THE VIGILANCE ORGANIZATION ON INDIAN RAILWAYS. 3

104             FUNCTIONS & RESPONSIBILITIES OF VIGILANCE FUNCTIONARIES IN RAILWAY BOARD.. 4

105             DUTIES OF THE CVOS ON THE RAILWAYS. 5

106             ROLE OF SUPERVISORY OFFICERS. 6

107             ASSOCIATION OF CVO WITH OTHER ORGANISATIONAL MATTERS. 6

108             APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS/STAFF FOR VIGILANCE WORK.. 6

109             DUTIES OF FUNCTIONARIES IN THE VIGILANCE DIRECTORATE, RAILWAY BOARD.. 7

110             DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES OF VIGILANCE OFFICIALS. 9

111             VIGILANCE BULLETIN.. 9

Chapter II CVC AND ITS JURISDICTION.. 19

201             VIGILANCE AGENCIES. 19

202             CENTRAL VIGILANCE COMMISSION.. 19

203             JURISDICTION OF CENTRAL VIGILANCE COMMISSION.. 19

204             JURISDICTION OVER OTHER CATEGORIES IN SPECIAL CASES. 20

205             FUNCTIONS AND POWERS OF CENTRAL VIGILANCE COMMISSION.. 21

206             ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE OF COMMISSION.. 24

207             ADVISORY FUNCTIONS OF COMMISSION—A SUMMARY.. 26

208             COMMISSIONERS OF DEPARTMENTAL INQUIRIES (CDI) 27

209             MODE OF COMMUNICATION BETWEEN MINISTRIES/ DEPARTMENTS & CVC.. 27

210             STATEMENTS/RETURNS TO BE SUBMITTED TO CVC.. 28

211             INTENSIVE EXAMINATION BY CHIEF TECHNICAL EXAMINER (CTE)/CVC.. 28

212             ACTION TO BE TAKEN ON CTE’s REPORTS. 29

213             STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE REGARDING LEGAL CASES WHERE CENTRAL VIGILANCE COMMISSION HAS BEEN MADE RESPONDENT ALONGWITH THE ORGANIZATIONS CONCERNED.. 31

Chapter III CENTRAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION.. 33

301             EVOLUTION.. 33

302             JURISDICTION OF CBI vis-à-vis STATE POLICE.. 33

303             PRESENT STRUCTURE, JURISDICTION & FUNCTIONS OF CBI. 33

304             ENQUIRY/INVESTIGATION BY CBI. 34

305             CO-OPERATION WITH CBI. 36

306             ACTION TO BE TAKEN WHEN BRIBE IS OFFERED.. 36

307             TRAP CASES. 37

308             SUSPENSION.. 37

309             TRANSFER OF AN OFFICER ON THE REQUEST OF CBI. 38

310             ASSISTANCE TO CBI BY TECHNICAL OFFICERS. 38

311             PROSECUTION.. 38

312             PREVIOUS SANCTION FOR CRIMINAL PROSECUTION.. 39

313             WITHDRAWAL OF PROSECUTION.. 42

314             DEPARTMENTAL ACTION ON CBI’s INVESTIGATION REPORT RECOMMENDING DEPARTMENTAL ACTION   42

315             SUPPLY OF DOCUMENTS BY CBI TO THE DISCIPLINARY AUTHORITY.. 43

316             DRAFT CHARGE SHEET.. 43

317             APPOINTMENT OF PRESENTING OFFICER.. 43

318             DOCUMENTS TO BE MADE AVAILABLE TO CBI AFTER DEPARTMENTAL PROCEEDINGS. 44

319             DIFFERENCE OF OPINION BETWEEN CBI AND ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITIES. 44

320             GRANT OF IMMUNITY/PARDON.. 44

321             LIAISON BETWEEN CBI AND THE ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITIES. 45

322             AGREED LIST/SECRET LIST.. 45

323             LISTS OF SUSPECTED NON-GAZETTED STAFF. 47

324             UNSCRUPULOUS CONTACT-MEN/WOMEN.. 48

325             RAILWAY SECTIONAL OFFICERS. 48

Chapter IV PREVENTIVE VIGILANCE.. 53

401             THE CONCEPT OF PREVENTIVE VIGILANCE.. 53

402             POTENTIAL AREAS OF CORRUPTION.. 53

403             PREVENTIVE VIGILANCE MEASURES. 54

404             INTEGRITY PACT.. 55

405             PREVENTIVE VIGILANCE AREAS. 56

406             PREVENTIVE CHECKS – CIVIL ENGINEERING.. 57

407             PREVENTIVE CHECKS MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL AND S & T ENGINEERING.. 58

408             PREVENTIVE CHECKS- TRAFFIC AND COMMERCIAL MATTERS. 60

409             PREVENTIVE CHECKS - STORES MATTERS. 64

410             PREVENTIVE CHECKS - RPF. 65

411             PREVENTIVE CHECKS - PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT.. 65

412             PREVENTIVE CHECKS - ACCOUNTS DEPARTMENT.. 66

413             PREVENTIVE CHECKS - MEDICAL DEPARTMENT.. 66

Chapter V HANDLING AND PROCESSING OF COMPLAINTS. 69

501             INTRODUCTION.. 69

502             SOURCE OF COMPLAINTS. 69

503             COMPLAINTS RECEIVED FROM CENTRAL VIGILANCE COMMISSION (OTHER THAN PIDPI) 70

504             COMPLAINTS RECEIVED UNDER PIDPI. 70

505             ACTION ON AUDIT REPORTS INCLUDING CAG PARAS, NEWS ITEMS, ETC. 72

506             COMPLAINTS BY EMAIL.. 73

507             ACTION ON COMPLAINTS RECEIVED FROM MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT AND DIGNITARIES  73

508             VERIFICATION OF GENUINENESS. 73

509             ANONYMOUS AND PSEUDONYMOUS COMPLAINTS. 74

510             ACTION AGAINST PERSONS MAKING FALSE COMPLAINTS. 74

511             WITHDRAWAL OF COMPLAINTS. 75

512             DEFINITION OF VIGILANCE ANGLE.. 75

513             REGISTRATION AND RECORDING OF COMPLAINTS. 77

514             EXAMINATION OF COMPLAINTS. 77

515             DECISION MAKING LEVEL (IN BOARD) 78

516             COMPLAINTS AND DECISION MAKING LEVEL AT RAILWAY/UNIT LEVEL.. 79

517             TARGET DATES FOR PROCESSING OF INVESTIGATION REPORTS IN CASES OF COMPLAINTS OTHER THAN CVC REFERRED COMPLAINTS. 80

518             DEPARTMENTAL TRAP CASES - PROCEDURE & GUIDELINES. 80

519             PROCEDURE OF INVESTIGATION.. 82

520             SEEKING OF CLARIFICATIONS ISSUED IN COURSE OF INVESTIGATION.. 83

521             REGISTRATION OF A CASE AGAINST RAILWAY OFFICIALS. 83

522             ISSUE OF QUESTIONNAIRE AFTER REGISTRATION OF CASE.. 84

523             ADVICE OF CLOSURE OF VIGILANCE INVESTIGATION.. 85

524             PREPARATION AND SUBMISSION OF THE INVESTIGATION REPORT.. 85

525             PROCEDURE FOR SUBMISSION OF REPORT TO THE SDGM/ PHODS AND OBTAINING THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE CONCERNED DISCIPLINARY AUTHORITIES AND GENERAL MANAGER.. 86

526             CASES INVOLVING GROUP ‘B’ (NON-GAZETTED) AND GROUP ‘C’ STAFF ONLY (i.e. NOT INVOLVING ANY GAZETTED OFFICER). 88

527             COMPOSITE CASES INVOLVING GROUP ‘C’ STAFF ALONGWITH GROUP ‘A’ OFFICER(S) OR GROUP ‘B’ OFFICER(S) WORKING IN SENIOR SCALE (ALSO CALLED CVC COMPOSITE CASES) 89

528             COMPOSITE CASES INVOLVING GROUP ‘C’ STAFF ALONGWITH GROUP ‘B’ OFFICER(S). 90

529             CONSULTATION WITH CVC AT THE APPEAL/REVISION STAGE.. 90

Chapter VI PROCESSING OF VIGILANCE CASES IN RAILWAY BOARD.. 95

601             INVESTIGATION OF CASES BY RAILWAY BOARD VIGILANCE.. 95

602             PROCESSING OF CASES. 95

603             CASES REQUIRED TO BE SENT BY RAILWAY BOARD TO CVC FOR ADVICE.. 97

604             CASES REQUIRED TO BE SENT TO RAILWAY BOARD BUT MAY NOT BE SENT TO CVC.. 97

605             CASES NOT REQUIRED TO BE REFERRED TO RAILWAY BOARD.. 97

606             FIRST STAGE ADVICE OF CVC/ PED(VIGILANCE) 98

607             PROCEDURE FOR OBTAINING SECOND STAGE ADVICE.. 99

608             DEVIATION CASE TO BE REPORTED TO COMMISSION.. 101

609             EXEMPTION FROM CONSULTATION IN CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES. 102

610             RECONSIDERATION OF ADVICE.. 102

611             COPIES OF THE INQUIRY REPORT.. 103

612             CASES TO BE DEALT AT THE LEVEL OF ZONAL RAILWAY/PRODUCTION UNIT ON CONCLUSION OF DISCIPLINARY PROCEEDINGS ARISING OUT OF FIRST STAGE ADVICE.. 103

613             CONVEYING DA’s ORDER TO CVC AND CONSULTATION WITH CVC.. 104

614             COPY OF CVC ADVICE TO THE CONCERNED EMPLOYEE.. 104

615             DAR ACTION AGAINST GAZETTED OFFICERS ON THE VERGE OF RETIREMENT.. 104

CHAPTER  VII VIGILANCE STATUS FOR MANAGEMENT DECISIONS. 107

701             ENSURING INTEGRITY OF PUBLIC SERVANTS. 107

702             VIGILANCE STATUS FOR DEPUTATION, AWARD, POSTING, PROMOTION, RETIREMENT and VARIOUS NOMINATIONS. 107

703             COMPLETE VIGILANCE HISTORY.. 107

704             NO-OBJECTION CERTIFICATE FOR ISSUE OF PASSPORT/VISA/EX-INDIA LEAVE.. 108

705             ENGAGEMENT OF CONSULTANTS AND EMPLOYMENT/ RE-EMPLOYMENT OF RETIRED RAILWAY OFFICERS IN THE PSUS UNDER MINISTRY OF RAILWAYS. 108

706             EMPANELMENT OF SERVING/ RETIRED RAILWAY OFFICERS AS ARBITRATORS. 108

707             VIGILANCE CLEARANCE IN REGARD TO BOARD LEVEL/ HIGHER THAN BOARD LEVEL APPOINTEES FOR PUBLIC SECTOR ENTERPRISES UNDER MINISTRY OF RAILWAYS. 109

708             IMPORTANT ISSUES REGARDING POSTINGS/ VIGILANCE STATUS. 109

709             VIGILANCE STATUS OF NON- GAZETTED STAFF. 109

Chapter VIII IMPORTANT ISSUES. 110

801             MONITORING OF VIGILANCE RELATED D&AR CASES-COORDINATION BETWEEN VIGILANCE AND THE ESTABLISHMENT BRANCHES. 110

802             ROLE OF E(O)I BRANCH OF RAILWAY BOARD IN VIGILANCE RELATED DAR CASES. 110

803             PROCEDURE FOR MINOR PENALTY PROCEEDINGS. 110

804             PROCEDURE OF MAJOR PENALTY PROCEEDINGS. 110

805             STANDARD OF PROOF IN DEPARTMENTAL PROCEEDING.. 112

806             LIST OF PENALTIES. 112

807             ADMINISTRATIVE ACTION.. 113

808             INSTRUCTIONS FOR PLACING OF WARNINGS/ DISPLEASURE ETC. IN THE APAR/ PERSONAL FILE   114

809             ROLE OF ESTABLISHMENT (D&A) BRANCH OF RAILWAY BOARD.. 115

810             ROLE OF PERSONNEL BRANCH OF ZONAL RAILWAYS IN VIGILANCE RELATED DAR CASES  116

811             SUSPENSION.. 117

812             ROLE OF INQUIRY OFFICERS. 118

813             PANEL OF RAILWAY INQUIRY OFFICERS. 118

814             NOMINATION OF RAILWAY INQUIRY OFFICERS. 119

815             HONORARIUM FOR INQUIRY OFFICERS. 119

816             HANDLING OF VIGILANCE CASES IN PUBLIC SECTOR UNDERTAKINGS. 121

817             POSTING AND TENURE OF OFFICERS IN THE VIGILANCE ORGANISATION.. 122

818             POSTING & TENURE OF VIGILANCE INSPECTORS/ INVESTIGATING INSPECTORS/ ENQUIRY INSPECTORS ON ZONAL RAILWAYS. 122

819             ROTATION OF OFFICIALS WORKING IN SENSITIVE POSTS. 123

820             SELECTION OF INVESTIGATING INSPECTORS IN RAILWAY BOARD.. 123

821             SELECTION OF VIGILANCE INSPECTORS IN ZONAL RAILWAYS. 124

822             PROTECTION AGAINST VICTIMIZATION OF VIGILANCE OFFICIALS. 125

823             TRAINING OF VIGILANCE OFFICIALS. 126

824             ISSUE OF IDENTITY CARDS TO VIGILANCE OFFICIALS. 127

825             CVC’s DIRECTIVES ON PUTTING THE TENDERS/CONTRACTS ON WEBSITE.. 127

826             WEBSITE OF CVC.. 127

827             PRESERVATION OF VARIOUS TYPES OF RECORDS OF VIGILANCE DEPARTMENT.. 128

828             RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT, 2005. 128

829             INTEGRITY PLEDGE.. 131

830             FORENSIC SCIENCE AS A TOOL FOR ENQUIRY/ INVESTIGATION.. 132

Chapter IX USEFUL INFORMATION.. 139

901             RELEVANT CLAUSES OF RAILWAY SERVICES (PENSION) RULES-1993. 139

902             RELEVANT INSTRUCTIONS FROM MINISTRY OF FINANCE.. 141

903             CHECK LIST FOR PUBLIC PROCUREMENT PROCESS. 141

904             COMPILATION OF GUIDELINES ON PUBLIC PROCUREMENT.. 141

905             DOPT INSTRUCTIONS ON SERVICE RULES. 142

906             HANDBOOK FOR INQUIRY OFFICERS AND DISCIPLINARY AUTHORITIES. 142

907             JUDGMENTS INFORMATION SYSTEM... 142

908             INDIA CODE.. 142

Chapter X SUSPENSION & BANNING OF BUSINESS DEALINGS ETC. OF SUPPLIERS AND BUILDING CONTRACTORS  143

1001          PROCEDURE.. 143

1002          DEFINITIONS. 143

1003          APPROVED LIST OF SUPPLIERS. 143

1004          REGISTRATION.. 144

1005          REMOVAL.. 144

1006          CONDITIONS FOR REMOVAL.. 144

1007          COMMUNICATION OF ORDERS. 144

1008          CERTAIN CLARIFICATIONS. 144

1009          PROCEDURE FOR REMOVAL FROM THE LIST OF APPROVED SUPPLIERS. 144

1010          SUSPENSION.. 145

1011          COMPETENCE OF AUTHORITY.. 145

1012          PROCEDURE FOR SUSPENSION.. 145

1013          BANNING.. 145

1014          BANNING BY ONE MINISTRY.. 146

1015          BANNING BY ALL MINISTRIES. 146

1016          SHOW CAUSE NOTICE.. 147

1017          REVOCATION OF ORDERS. 148

1018          COMMUNICATION TO FIRMS. 148

1019          CLEARING AND TRANSPORT ORGANISATION.. 148

1020          REVIEW... 148

1021          MAINTENANCE OF UP-TO-DATE LIST.. 148

1022          CLASSIFICATION OF ORDERS. 148

1023          PROCEDURE TO BE FOLLOWED BY RAILWAYS, PRODUCTION UNITS, ETC. FOR BANNING OF BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO ALL MINISTRIES. 148

1024          PROCEDURE TO BE FOLLOWED BY RAILWAYS, PRODUCTION UNITS, ETC. FOR BANNING OF BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO ONE MINISTRY.. 149

1025          EXTENSION OF BANNING ORDERS TO ALLIED/SISTER CONCERNS. 149

1026          PROCEDURE TO BE FOLLOWED IN RAILWAY BOARD’S OFFICE FOR SUSPENSION/BANNING OF BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO MINISTRY OF RAILWAYS ONLY.. 150

1027          PROCEDURE TO BE FOLLOWED IN RAILWAY BOARD’S OFFICE FOR BANNING OF BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO ALL MINISTRIES OF THE GOVERNMENT OF INDIA.. 151

1028          PROCEDURE.. 151

1029          SAFEGUARD.. 151

1030          CODE FOR BUILDING AND WORKS CONTRACTS. 151

1031          GENERAL.. 154

Protocol for updating the Indian Railways Vigilance Manual-2018. 166


 

 

From Central Vigilance Commission

 

We are happy that the Indian Railways has revised its Vigilance Manual, which was last published in 2006.  The Indian Railways first published the Vigilance Manual in 1970 and later revised it in 1996 and 2006.  From 2006, it is a long-time and considerable changes took place in the Indian Railways, in particular, and in all organizations in general, in their functions due to changes of Rules, Technology, etc. Thus, there was an urgent and imperative need to revise the Manual.

2.       We are also happy to note that the new Manual has incorporated relevant provisions from the CVC’s Manual revised and released in 2017. We are also happy to note that the online version of this Vigilance Manual (like CVC Manual) hyper-linking important Circulars, Orders, etc. is going to be uploaded on Indian Railways’ website simultaneously.

3.       The Commission congratulates the Directorate of Vigilance of the Ministry of Railways and all others who are associated with the revision and publication of the revised Manual.

4.       While revision and publication of the Manual is an important step-forward, it is equally important to make all concerned, not only the vigilance professionals, to frequently consult the Manual while carrying out their duties.  Only then, the purpose of the Manual will be served.  We hope that the Directorate of Vigilance and the Railway Board will ensure the same.

 

 

 

(T.M.Bhasin)

Vigilance Commissioner

(Sharad Kumar)

Vigilance Commissioner

 

 

 

(K.V.Chowdary)

Central Vigilance Commissioner

 

New Delhi

29th August, 2018


 

          The Indian Railways Vigilance Manual was first published in 1970 and was last revised in 2006.  In the decade since then, there have been many changes in the procedures, rules and policies relating to Vigilance Administration. Hence there was a need to update the Manual and I am happy that this has been done now.  This new version will also be available on the Indian Railways website and relevant orders and circulars will be hyperlinked, thus making future updation easier.

          The Vigilance Organization of Indian Railways is a fundamental and essential part of management with a clearly defined role. The focus of the Government is on integrity and ethical behavior.  This can be ensured only when procedures are laid down clearly and a compilation of the rules and procedures is the first step towards good governance. I am sure that this Manual will be useful to the Ministry and Field Units for Vigilance Administration on the Indian Railways system. 

          I compliment the Vigilance Directorate for undertaking this mammoth task of bringing out the revised and updated Indian Railways Vigilance Manual, 2018.

 

(Ashwani Lohani)

Chairman, Railway Board

 

New Delhi

4th September, 2018

 


 

 

Over the last decade or so Vigilance administration on Indian Railways has seen a considerable number of changes in its rules & procedures. Most changes were necessitated by new challenges which were thrown up, modifications of policy or simplification in the systems of working.  It is thus prudent and necessary that the Indian Railways Vigilance Manual, which was first published in 1970 and last revised in 2006, is updated and the amendments of the intervening period are incorporated.

Revising the Manual has involved considerable effort in selecting, reiterating, modifying and deleting provisions from the earlier Manual. We expect that most of what is important and current in vigilance matters has been incorporated.  We have made certain changes in the format of the Manual.  The sequence of chapters has been modified and some chapters have even been deleted.  An attempt has also been made to simplify details and I hope that our efforts will lead to easier understanding and referencing from this Manual.

An on-line version of this Manual will be uploaded on the Indian Railways’ website – ‘www.indianrailways.gov.in’- and we expect that making subsequent changes, when necessary, will become easier and will be done on-line.  We have also hyperlinked important circulars from the Ministry of Railways, the Central Vigilance Commission and the Department of Personnel & Training.  The revised Vigilance Manual 2017 issued by the Central Vigilance Commission has been used extensively for incorporating material for our IRVM.

It needs to be stated that the provisions of the Manual do not supersede any rule contained in Railway Codes and, in case of any conflict, the provisions in the Railway Codes shall prevail.  We recommend a reference to the original rules and instructions of the concerned Directorate whenever any doubts arise.  This is particularly true in the sphere of Establishment and D&AR matters.  

Bringing out this Manual has been a gratifying experience.  The team-work and coordination displayed by the entire Vigilance Directorate of the Railway Board and the Vigilance departments of Zonal Railways has been exemplary. Teams were formed within the Directorate to review different chapters.  After the initial work was done in the Railway Board, the Manual was circulated to the Zonal Railways’ Vigilance departments where also separate teams were formed by the SDGMs to look at various chapters. Thereafter, the suggested changes were incorporated and the final document was reviewed by the Executive Directors and Directors of the Vigilance Directorate in the Railway Board several times.  The result is now available with you.

I am deeply indebted to Shri B.M. Gupta, former Senior Executive Director Vigilance/Engineering and Shri A.K. Vajpayee, former Executive Director Vigilance/ Accounts, whose experience in the Vigilance department and inputs were very valuable to us.  The present team of  Shri R.K. Jha, ED Vigilance/ Engineering, Shri R.K. Rai, ED Vigilance/Electrical, Shri Arvind Srivastava, ED Vigilance/Stores, Shri S.K. Tyagi, ED Vigilance/Traffic, Smt. Ambika Jain, ED Vigilance/Accounts, Shri Garib Dass, Director Vigilance/Police,  Shri Andaleeb Razi, Director Vigilance/ Traffic and his predecessor Shri Anshuman Kumar, Smt. Manisha Chatterjee, Director Vigilance/Traffic-II, Shri P.K. Sharma, Director Vigilance/Engineering-I, Shri A.K. Marantu, Director Vigilance/Engineering-II,  Shri Ranjit Kumar, Director Vigilance/S&T, Smt. Suman Sharma, Director Vigilance/Stores, Shri Sunil Kumar Singh, Director Vigilance/Intelligence, Shri Anil Chopra, Joint Director Vigilance (Conf.), Shri Harish Chander, Joint Director Vigilance/R&SC, Shri R.P. Joshi, Joint Director Vigilance/Stores, Shri Jagdish Pandey, Deputy Director Vigilance/Confidential, Shri R.C. Pandey, Deputy Director Vigilance/Traffic and Shri T.P. Sah, Section Officer (V-1) and many others have all contributed substantially towards bringing out this Manual. Smt. Gomathi Sankar and Smt. Priya Gopalakrishnan, Deputy Directors, were earlier posted in Vigilance Directorate and despite being posted elsewhere now, have continuously provided their inputs. I also wish to thank the SDGMs & CVOs, the Dy. CVO’s in the Zones and other numerous functionaries in the Vigilance Departments of Indian Railways for their contributions. Special mention must be made of Shri Srinivas Malladi, Dy. CVO/Engg/SCR who had undertaken the arduous task of reviewing the entire manuscript, comparing it with the CVC manual, existing IRVM and all related circulars and then offering valuable suggestions. I must also express appreciation for Shri Sanjay Khurana, Principal Private Secretary, Smt. Janaki Ramesh, earlier PSO, Shri Pranab Kumar Tripathy, Principal Private Secretary, Smt. K. Parvathi, Private Secretary and Shri Sudhir Kumar, Sainik, for their diligent, dedicated and professional assistance provided during this time.

This Manual would never have been printed if it had not been for the stellar contribution of Shri Rajnish Kumar, Director Vigilance/Mechanical, who has coordinated efforts within this Directorate, with the Zonal Railways and Production Units, and who went into every word and every other nitty-gritty to bring this effort to fruition. More than anyone else, this has been his sustained and dedicated effort of more than one year. I am responsible for holding him back from going on deputation just so that he could complete the Manual before he left. I wish him success in his future career.

I would also like to personally thank Shri K.V. Chowdary, Central Vigilance Commissioner, Dr. T.M. Bhasin, Vigilance Commissioner, and Shri Sharad Kumar, Vigilance Commissioner for their support and guidance. I profusely thank Shri Ashwani Lohani, Chairman, Railway Board, who has encouraged us to bring out this Manual.

In times like this when the world is changing so fast, it is likely that this version of the Manual will also need to undergo changes.  We look forward to suggestions for amendments or improvements in the Manual.  We will examine all suggestions carefully and make the changes as necessary.

 

(Sunil Mathur)

Principal Exec. Director &

Chief Vigilance Officer

Ministry of Railways

 

4th September, 2018

New Delhi

 


(i)            The Indian Railways Vigilance Manual 2018 is intended only to be a reference book and it cannot be a substitute for rules, orders, etc. of various authorities.

(ii)          We have taken every effort to provide accurate and updated information in the IRVM 2018. For any inadvertent error and omission or doubt, the Vigilance Directorate, Ministry of Railways may be contacted for clarification.

(iii)        Vigilance Directorate does not take responsibility for accuracy and completeness of third party Circulars/ Citations, etc. referred in the Manual.

(iv)        The Hyperlinks to third party websites that have been included in this Manual are provided for public convenience only. The Directorate is not responsible for the contents or reliability of the hyperlinked websites and does not necessarily endorse the view expressed within them or guarantee the availability of such linked pages at all times.

 

 

All rights reserved, 2018

 

This book is permitted for non-commercial use in any form by anybody or by any organisation. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, for any commercial use, without the prior written permission of the Vigilance Directorate, Ministry of Railways



 


101       INTRODUCTION

101.1 The demon of corruption dates back to times immemorial.  As early as the 4th Century BC, Kautilya referred to as many as 40 ways of committing embezzlement of the treasury in his treatise, “Arthashashtra”.  Over the centuries, the world has faced corrupt practices in different forms in almost all walks of life.  The challenge before us today is to create an environment in which integrity and honesty prevail and corruption is punished promptly.  The hallmark of good governance is having a clean and transparent administration and, therefore, vigilance administration in any organisation forms an integral part of management. The Vigilance Organisation on Indian Railways has been set up to investigate complaints of corruption, conduct preventive checks, suggest system improvements and to ensure that those held guilty of irregularities are appropriately punished.   Its role is both preventive and punitive. 

101.2 Indian Railways is the largest government organisation with more than 13 lakh employees which includes about 18000 officers.  This is an organisation with a 165 year history and which today operates more than 23000 trains across its 66,000 route kilometres and 7100 railway stations every day, which has more than 2.3 crore originating passengers and loads more than 3 million tonnes of freight traffic daily, which runs its trains 24x7, and which has a continuous public interface.  The nature of its work and its operations present many opportunities for corrupt practices to arise.  While a large number of its officials and staff are considered to be honest and dedicated to their work, it can also be said that there are many whose integrity is questionable.

101.3 It is the role of the administration in any organisation to set up systems which encourage integrity and transparency and come down heavily on corrupt practices.  Essentially, every officer and staff is himself/herself a vigilance officer and needs to ensure probity in the work being done by him/her and the people who work with him/her.  The Vigilance organisation is an essential and integral part of Indian Railways and assists the department towards running a clean and efficient administration.

102       EVOLUTION OF THE VIGILANCE ORGANIZATION

102.1 Special Police Establishment - Recognizing the gravity of the problem of corruption, the Government established an agency to combat it, namely, the Special Police Establishment (SPE), in terms of the Delhi SPE Act, 1946.  The Prevention of Corruption Act 1947 was also passed as an endeavour in this direction.

102.2 Indian Railway Enquiry Committee - In the Railway sector, the Indian Railway Enquiry Committee was appointed in 1947 to undertake a general survey of Railway working.  This Committee recognized the evil of corruption and stressed the need to tackle it.  The first organizational response in this direction came in the shape of Railway Board’s decision in April, 1948 to establish an independent Anti Corruption Department on each Zonal Railway for the prevention, detection and departmental investigation of cases of corruption. In order to avoid any conflict with working of the SPE, the ambit of this department was delineated as below:

a)                  Cases involving departmental/procedural irregularities, which resulted in preferential treatment to traders, travellers, contractors, other individuals/firms. (However, the case was to be handed over to the SPE if there was any probability of illegal gratification in it). 

b)                  Corruption cases which the SPE was not in a position to take up. 

c)                  Cases of corruption handed over by SPE for departmental action, owing to lack of sufficient/relevant evidence for prosecution.

102.3 The Zonal Vigilance Organization was under the administrative control of the Chief Security Officer. 

102.4 Railway Corruption Enquiry Committee - The wheels of time – and corruption – moved on and the next milestone of anti-corruption efforts was the appointment of “The Railway Corruption Enquiry Committee” by the Ministry of Railways on 9th September 1953.  This was a parliamentary committee, with Acharya J.B.Kripalani as its chairman.  Its brief was to look at the entire gamut of corruption issues on Indian Railways: extent of corruption among Railway employees in public dealings, methods of corruption adopted by them, causes of corruption, responsibility of the public, loopholes in rules & regulations that left room for corruption, and administrative & legal measures to eradicate this evil.  The Committee submitted its report, consisting of 152 recommendations, on 9th July 1955.  The Ministry of Railways accepted 143 recommendations. It was on the recommendations of the Kripalani Committee that the existing anti-corruption departments were re-organized for greater effectiveness and re-named as “Vigilance” units. These Vigilance units were established on all Zonal Railways in 1956 and were placed under senior scale officers.

102.5 Administrative Vigilance Division - It has already been mentioned earlier that the SPE was established in 1946.  However, this organization could not become very effective, owing to its organizational defects and resistance to its activities from various ministries.  Accordingly, it was decided to establish an organization in the Ministry of Home Affairs which would assume overall responsibility to direct and coordinate anti- corruption activities of all the Ministries in the Government of India. This organization was named the Administrative Vigilance Division, which began functioning in August, 1955.

102.6 Central Investigation Agency - A “Central Investigation Agency’’ began functioning in the Railway Board from February, 1957, with Director (Vigilance) as its administrative head.  This agency was entrusted with functions of collecting intelligence, investigating important cases of corruption amongst Railway officers, making any other inquiries given to it, and liaison with SPE and State Police in important investigations.

102.7 In December 1957, the Railway Board transferred administrative control of the Vigilance organization from the Chief Security Officer to the Senior Deputy General Manager (SDGM) at the level of each Zonal Railway. In the same year, separate Vigilance Engineering cells were created on Zonal Railways, consisting of a senior-scale Railway Engineer and an Accounts Officer, in order to investigate into complaints pertaining to engineering work. Much later, in 1965, Vigilance Stores cells were also added to the Zonal Organization.

102.8 Despite various measures having been taken to combat the menace of corruption, the public – and Parliamentary – perception was that there was still a long way to go before this problem could be tamed. Several Members of Parliament gave vent to these feelings while participating in the debate on demands for the Ministry of Home Affairs in June 1962. They referred to the growing menace of corruption in administration.  While replying to the debate on 6th June 1962, Shri Lal Bahadur Shastri, Minister for Home Affairs, proposed establishment of a committee of MPs and Government officials to review the problem of corruption and make recommendations in this regard.

102.9 Committee on Prevention of Corruption (Santhanam Committee) -Thus was born the “Committee on Prevention of Corruption”, under the chairmanship of Shri K.Santhanam, Hon’ble MP.  This committee made several far-reaching recommendations, the foremost of which was the establishment of the Central Vigilance Commission (CVC).  The CVC came into being in February 1964 as the apex agency to advise and guide Central Government agencies in the field of vigilance.

102.10 Administrative Reforms Commission - The Santhanam Committee also recommended that there should be a separate Member Vigilance in the Railway Board (with the status of Secretary to the Government of India) who would have full control over the Vigilance Organization on Zonal Railways.   The rationale for this was that he would be able to act with authority and independence in all Vigilance matters on the Indian Railways, being subject to the jurisdiction of CVC. However, this recommendation was not accepted.  The Santhanam Committee had reviewed the issue of corruption in great detail and provided the blue print for action in this sphere.  Years later, in 1970, the issue of corruption was revisited by the Administrative Reforms Commission.  While discussing the Vigilance set-up on Indian Railways, this Commission recommended that there should be a Director General of the Vigilance Organization in the Railway Board, who should work directly under the Chairman, Railway Board.  At the Zonal level, it was suggested that the Vigilance Organization should work in close consultation with General Managers – however, there was no objection to Zonal Vigilance having direct dealings with Director General of Railway Board Vigilance, provided the General Manager was kept duly informed.  The Commission also pointed out that the respective Heads of Department were vested with the responsibility of checking corruption, and that Vigilance needed to keep them informed about vigilance matters in their respective spheres. 

102.11 Task Force on Vigilance - The Ministry of Railways established a “Task Force on Vigilance” in June 1977 to review the entire range of issues relating to corruption on the Indian Railways, as also to report on the follow-up action taken on the recommendations of the Kripalani Committee.  This task force consisted of three senior officials of the Vigilance Directorate.  Its report was submitted in February, 1978, which consisted of 275 recommendations.  Most of these recommendations were accepted. 

103       PRESENT STRUCTURE OF THE VIGILANCE ORGANIZATION ON INDIAN RAILWAYS

103.1 The structure of Vigilance on Indian Railways has been moulded over the years by recommendations of various Committees, as mentioned above. At present, the Vigilance Organization on Indian Railways is headed by Principal Executive Director (Vigilance) [earlier known as Adviser, Vigilance], who is the Chief Vigilance Officer, Ministry of Railways, and reports to Chairman, Railway Board. He is a link between the Ministry of Railways and CVC.  He is in the rank of Additional Secretary, Government of India. He is assisted by a team of Officers & staff in the Vigilance Directorate of Railway Board.  At present, there are five Executive Directors belonging to the Accounts, Engineering, Electrical and S&T, Stores & Traffic disciplines – they are in turn assisted by Directors/Joint Directors/Deputy Directors.  There is also a post of Director Vigilance (P), which has traditionally been manned by IPS officers. The organizational chart of the Vigilance Directorate at the apex level in the Railway Board is shown in Annexure 1.1. Duties of various functionaries are given in para 104.

103.2 At the level of Zonal Railways, the Vigilance Organization is headed by the Senior Deputy General Manager (SDGM), who is also designated as the Chief Vigilance Officer of the Zonal Railway. In Production Units & Public Sector Undertakings attached to the Ministry of Railways, the Vigilance Organization is headed by a Chief Vigilance Officer (although the CVC refers to the CVOs as Vigilance Officers only). The CVO reports directly to the General Manager/Head of the Unit.  He is generally in the rank of Joint Secretary to the Government of India.  He is assisted by Vigilance officers drawn from various disciplines of Railway services – Chief Vigilance Officers (Senior Administrative Grade), Dy. Chief Vigilance Officers (Selection Grade/Junior Administrative Grade), Vigilance Officers (Senior Scale) and Assistant Vigilance Officers (Junior Scale) – and inspectors, watchers, office staff etc.  The exact composition of Vigilance officials varies across Railways. The representative structure of the Vigilance organization on Zonal Railways, Production Units and PSUs is shown in Annexure 1.2.

103.3 In the case of small units/PSUs, it may not always be possible to have a full time Chief Vigilance Officer.  In that case, an officer with relatively less executive responsibilities is made in-charge of Vigilance work in that unit – in such cases, it is to be ensured that he is not given additional charge of sensitive matters, like dealing with tenders, selections, arbitrations, etc.  In the case of small attached units, a contiguous unit having a full-fledged Vigilance set-up is made responsible for Vigilance functions of that unit as well.  Details are shown in Annexure 1.3.

103.4 There is also a full-fledged enquiry organization under the administrative control of SDGM, to deal with D&A (Discipline & Appeal) enquiries arising from Vigilance cases.  This organization is manned by Enquiry Officers (Sr. Scale), Assistant Enquiry Officers (Junior Scale) and Enquiry Inspectors.

104       FUNCTIONS & RESPONSIBILITIES OF VIGILANCE FUNCTIONARIES IN RAILWAY BOARD

While it is difficult to outline an exhaustive list of functions & responsibilities of Vigilance functionaries, as the sphere of Vigilance is ever-evolving, an indicative list is as under:

(i)            Undertake prompt investigation of authenticated complaints, with special emphasis on Presidential & PMO references, CA-iii references (Procedure for handling CA-iii references has been included as Annexure 1.6), CVC-referred complaints, complaints appearing in the media and serious complaints, involving malafide intent, sent by members of the public.

(ii)          Carry out checks, with follow-up investigations, on serious cases of irregularities, based on source information.

(iii)        Ensure speedy processing of Vigilance cases at all stages. Undertake regular review of these cases.

(iv)        Ensure that charge sheets are prepared accurately, without any loopholes, and relevant documents are carefully sorted out and sent promptly to the Inquiry Officer.

(v)          Ensure prompt appointment of the Presenting Officer (PO) and the Inquiry Officer (IO) for DAR inquiries. 

(vi)        Ensure that DAR inquiries are conducted expeditiously by Inquiry Officers, who are under the administrative control of SDGMs. 

(vii)      Process the IO’s report properly and expeditiously for obtaining final orders of the Disciplinary Authority. 

(viii)    Ensure that the Central Vigilance Commission (CVC) is consulted at all relevant stages (details in Chapter II & VI), in an expeditious manner.

(ix)        Ensure prompt submission of returns to CVC.

(x)          Maintain close liaison with CVC, CBI and the Department of Personnel & Training.

(xi)        Take appropriate and expeditious action with regard to Court cases.

(xii)      Ensure that proper assistance is given to CBI for investigation of cases. 

(xiii)    Develop a system of collecting intelligence about malpractices being committed in the Organization. 

(xiv)    Scrutinize reports of Parliamentary Committees, Audit Reports, proceedings of both Houses of Parliament, news items in the media, annual property statements, etc. to obtain information about irregularities that pertain to the Organization. 

(xv)      Keep a close watch on the functioning & integrity of personnel in the Vigilance department itself. 

(xvi)    Undertake review of existing rules & procedures, with a view to plug loopholes and suggest systemic improvements to curb corruption.

(xvii)  Maintain close surveillance on officials of doubtful integrity, and those who are on the ‘Agreed’ and ‘Secret’ lists.

(xviii)Arrange regular and surprise inspections at sensitive work units, which are susceptible to corruption.

(xix)    Monitor adherence to aspects of Conduct Rules relating to integrity. 

(xx)      Disseminate awareness about Vigilance, through Vigilance bulletins, seminars, workshops, lectures, etc. 

(xxi)    Undertake regular inspection of the Vigilance branch.

105       DUTIES OF THE CVOS ON THE RAILWAYS

(i)            The duties and functions mentioned in para 104 for the CVO of the Ministry of Railways would also ipso facto be applicable to the CVOs of Zonal Railways to the extent they are concerned with these functions.

(ii)          In addition to the functions stated in (i) above, the CVOs will scrutinize all the complaints and source information received in zonal vigilance. They will further ensure that a time schedule is drawn up by the concerned Dy. CVOs/VOs with their VIs, for all the investigations to be conducted by Railway Vigilance and that all such investigations are finalized promptly and the investigation reports submitted to Railway Board in the cases involving gazetted officers within a period not exceeding 3 weeks in case of PIDPI complaints and two months in case of other CVC referred complaints.

(iii)        The CVOs will also carry out a periodical review of all the DAR cases with the CPO/ Dy.CPO(G), etc.

(iv)        He must also ensure that preventive checks are carried out and the minimum number prescribed in this regard viz. 40 preventive checks per year per Vigilance Inspector is strictly observed. Some of the preventive checks should also be carried out by the Dy.CVOs/ VOs/ AVOs personally.

(v)          The CVO must also carry out inspection of his Vigilance Branch at least once a year.

(vi)        They must also ensure that enquiries by the EO/ EIs (Vig.) and other Enquiry Officers are conducted expeditiously and that EO (Vig.)/ EI (Vig.) submits four enquiry reports per month.

(vii)      Periodical meetings should also be held with the Dy.CVOs/ VOs with a view to discussing pendency and expediting disposals.

(viii)    Periodical meetings should be held with SPs/ SPE/ CBI concerned.

(ix)        To frame, review and furnish periodically the agreed list, the secret list, and the list of undesirable contact persons to Railway Board.

(x)          To appoint Dy.CVOs/ VOs/ AVOs and EOs after obtaining the approval of the CVO of the Ministry of Railways.

(xi)        To ensure that the tenure of VOs/ VIs is not normally exceeded and no extensions are granted without prior specific approval of the Authority.

(xii)      To ensure that the Dy.CVOs/ VOs etc, including the CVO himself do not sit on any Tender Committee or Selection Committees as per rules in force.

(xiii)    Periodical Lectures and talks with officers DRMs/HODs, and Staff in Zonal Training School to spread Vigilance education.  

106       ROLE OF SUPERVISORY OFFICERS

(i)            It is the duty of every officer holding a Supervisory post in any organisation to take all possible steps to ensure the integrity and devotion to duty of all officials for the time being under his control and authority.

(ii)          The supervisory officer ensures that officers for the time being under his control maintain absolute integrity. A column has been introduced in the proforma for Annual Performance Appraisal Report (APAR) of officials in which the supervisory officer reports on the integrity of the officer reported upon. If any suspicion arises upon the integrity of officials under his control, further action is taken as per guidelines issued in this regard.

107       ASSOCIATION OF CVO WITH OTHER ORGANISATIONAL MATTERS

107.1 Participation in decision making or close association of CVO or the vigilance staff in such matters over which they might be required, at a later stage, to sit in judgment from vigilance point of view, should be avoided.  Therefore, CVO and the vigilance functionaries should not be a party to decision-making processes, which are likely to have vigilance sensitivity, as this may result in conflict of interest. However, advice can be tendered on some policy matters especially those requiring implementation of preventive vigilance measures.

107.2 While it may not be difficult for full-time vigilance functionaries to comply with this requirement, the compliance of these instructions could be achieved in respect of part-time vigilance functionaries by confining their duties, other than those connected with vigilance work, as far as possible, to such items of work that are either free from vigilance angle or preferably serve as input to vigilance activities such as inspection, audit, etc. 

108       APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS/STAFF FOR VIGILANCE WORK 

108.1 The Chief Vigilance Officer of a Ministry – PED (Vigilance), in case of the Ministry of Railways – is appointed only after prior consultation with the CVC.  Prior consultation with CVC is also necessary if a change of CVO is sought.

108.2 All other Gazetted Officers in the Vigilance Organization are appointed only after obtaining prior clearance from the PED (Vigilance).  Vigilance Inspectors and staff in a Vigilance unit are posted after the approval of the Chief Vigilance Officer of the Unit. 

108.3 Zonal Railways are also allowed to create posts of Vigilance Inspectors, charged to Civil Engineering, Electrical and S&T construction projects. (Details in Annexure 1.5)

109       DUTIES OF FUNCTIONARIES IN THE VIGILANCE DIRECTORATE, RAILWAY BOARD

109.1 Executive Director Vigilance (Engineering)

(i)            Deals with cases of Engineering and Mechanical Departments

(ii)          Furnishes vigilance status of officials of Engineering and Mechanical Departments

(iii)        Deals with vigilance cases pertaining to tenders of Engineering and Mechanical Departments

(iv)        Deals with all matters of Vigilance policy.

(v)          Processes banning of firms of Engineering and Mechanical Departments

(vi)        Processes intake of Vigilance Inspectors on deputation basis in the Vigilance Directorate, and posting of Vigilance officers on Zonal Railways.

(vii)      Deals with recruitment of Hawaldars & Sainiks in the Vigilance Directorate.

(viii)    Deals with staff matters in the Vigilance Directorate.

(ix)        Nodal Officer for preparation of Agreed & Secret lists.

(x)          Organizes training courses for Vigilance Officers and Vigilance Inspectors. 

(xi)        Organizes SDGMs’ conferences.

(xii)      Arranges printing of Vigilance Bulletins.

(xiii)    Coordinates dispatch of returns to CVC.

(xiv)    Processes statistical information, publicity etc.

(xv)      Keeps a watch on working of the Inquiry Organization on various Zonal Railways.

(xvi)    Nominates Inquiry Officers for DAR inquiries in cases of Gazetted Officials.

EDV(E) is assisted by Director Vigilance (Engineering) I & II, Director Vigilance (Mechanical) and Dy. Director (Vigilance I & III), and Vigilance I, III branches. Director Vigilance (Mechanical) assists EDVE in all the administrative and policy functions of the Vigilance Directorate which have been indicated above.

109.2 Executive Director Vigilance (Traffic)

(i)            Deals with all cases of the Traffic Department other than irregularity in selections involving Traffic Officers.

(ii)          Organizes checks in spheres of Traffic Undercharges, Mass Contact Areas, Commercial Contracts, etc.

(iii)        Deals with all cases of misuse of duty pass, privilege pass, PTO and all other types of passes.

(iv)        Deals with vigilance cases pertaining to tenders of the Commercial Department.

(v)          Furnishes vigilance status of officials of the Traffic Department.

EDV(T) is assisted by Director Vigilance (Traffic)-I and Director Vigilance(Traffic)-II, Dy. Director Vigilance (Vig-II & Traffic), Assistant Vigilance Officer(Traffic) and Vigilance-II & Vigilance (Special Squad) branches.

109.3 Executive Director Vigilance (Stores)

(i)            Deals with all cases relating to the Stores Department.

(ii)          Deals with all cases of purchase through Stores Department, including purchases of the Medical Department.

(iii)        Deals with computerization in the Vigilance Organization.

(iv)        Furnishes vigilance status of officials of the Stores Department.

EDV(S) is assisted by Director Vigilance (Stores), Joint Director Vigilance (Confidential), Joint Director Vigilance (Stores), Dy. Director Vigilance (Confidential), Vigilance-IV and Vigilance Confidential Branches. Director Vigilance (Stores) is also the nodal CPIO for RTI in Vigilance Directorate.

109.4 Executive Director Vigilance (Accounts)

(i)                 Deals with all cases of Accounts, Personnel, Medical and General Administration Departments.

(ii)               Deals with all cases of irregularities in selections, except those done by Railway Recruitment Boards (RRBs).

(iii)             Furnishes vigilance status of officials of Accounts, Personnel & Medical Departments.

 

EDV(A) is assisted by Dy. Director Vigilance (A&P, i.e. Accounts & Personnel), and the Vigilance IV branch. 

109.5 Executive Director Vigilance (Electrical)

(i)            Deals with cases of Electrical and S&T departments.

(ii)          Furnishes vigilance status of officials of Electrical and S&T departments.

(iii)        Deals with Vigilance cases pertaining to tenders of Electrical and S&T departments in which Convener is from Electrical and S&T department.

(iv)        Processes cases of banning of firms pertaining to Electrical and S&T departments.

(v)          Updation of website of Vigilance Directorate.

(vi)        Organises checks in spheres pertaining to Electrical and S&T departments.

Executive Director Vigilance (Electrical) is assisted by Director Vigilance (S&T), AVO (Electrical) and Vigilance III(4) branch in performance of these activities.

109.6 Director Vigilance (Police)

(i)            Deals with all cases of the Security Department, Intelligence Branch, Railway Recruitment Boards, Members of Railway Board, Officers of the level of Directors and above in Railway PSUs and Vigilance Personnel.

(ii)          Maintains liaison with CBI & Police.

(iii)        Furnishes vigilance status of officials of the Security Department, Intelligence Branch, Railway Recruitment Boards, Railway Board Officials and Vigilance Department.

DV(P) is assisted by Director Vigilance(I), Joint Director (R&SC) (i.e. RRB & Security), and Dy. Director Vigilance (Confidential), and the Vigilance Confidential Branch. Director Vigilance(I) also handles Training, CPGRAMS and reports to EDVE for these subjects.

110       DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES OF VIGILANCE OFFICIALS

110.1 The Vigilance officials are authorized to enter any of the premises of Indian Railways, including its PSUs, inspect any records and take possession of such documents, materials or stores under the control of Railway as are necessary in connection with the investigation of a case as per procedure.

110.2 The Vigilance officials are authorised to check the Ticket/Travel Authority/ Pass of passengers under section 54 of Indian Railways Act, 1989.

110.3 The Vigilance officials are authorized to check the cash of any railway official, who is required to declare his private cash and take the statement(s) of any official(s) /passenger(s)/ user(s)/ contractor(s). While conducting checks on officials dealing with cash, Vigilance officials are empowered to check places where possibility of keeping cash exists. This will also extend to recovery of Government currency notes from suspect officials in case of Departmental Decoy Checks and Traps.

110.4 Vigilance officials are authorized to tender requisition to non-gazetted officials of Railways to witness or to assist or to associate with the checks.  The tendered officials, in such cases, need not seek any prior permission from their higher authorities for assisting vigilance officials.  For assistance of a Gazetted officer, the request should be from a Vigilance Officer only. 

110.5 Officers and staff of all Departments shall render every assistance to Vigilance officials in the discharge of their official duties.

110.6 While going for inspection, check or investigation, Vigilance Inspectors should carry with them a current and valid Identity Card to show to the parties concerned before proceeding with the checks.

111       VIGILANCE BULLETIN

111.1 A Vigilance bulletin is brought out periodically on Zonal Railways.  It highlights major vigilance cases involving irregularities, violation of rules and procedures, malpractices, misuse of powers etc. as detected during vigilance checks and investigations.  It also contains write-ups on policy matters and guides Railway personnel on extant rules & procedures, helping them to avoid possible mistakes.


 

Annexure–1.1

ORGANIZATIONAL SET UP CHART OF

VIGILANCE DIRECTORATE, RAILWAY BOARD

 

PED/VIG

EDVE

DVE-I

DVE-II

DDV3

SO V3-1

SO V3-2

DV-M

DD V1

DD V3

SO V1

EDVL

DV(S&T)

AVO-L

SO V34

EDVT

DVT-I

AVO-T

DD V2

DDVT

SO V2(1)

SO V2(2)

DVT-II

SO VSS-1

SO VSS-2

EDVS

DVS

JDVS

JDVC

SO VC

EDVA

DDV-A&P

SO V4-1

SO V4-4

DVP

DV-I

DDVC

JDV-R&SC

 

EDV(E)       Looks after Engineering and Mechanical Departments, Agreed  List/Secret List, Policy Matters & Co-ordination.

EDV(L)       Looks after Electrical and S&T Departments.

EDV(T)       Looks after Traffic Department

EDV(S)       Looks after Stores Department

EDV(A)      Looks after Accounts, Personnel, Medical & General Administration Departments

DV(P)         Looks after RRB, Security Department, cases of Members of  Railway Board, vigilance personnel, cases of officers of PSUs (CMDs and Board level appointees) and co-ordination with CBI.

 

Annexure –1.2

Representative Vigilance Organization of Zonal Railways

SDGM

DY.CVO(T)

VO(T)

or

AVO(T)

DY.CVO(E)

AVO(E)

DY.CVO(S)

VO(M)

or

AVO(M)

DY.CVO(A)

AVO(P)

DY.CVO(ELEC)

or DY. CVO(S&T)

 

 

Organisation of Vigilance Department in Production Units/other Units

Chief Vigilance Officer in SA Grade

Deputy Chief Vigilance Officer in SG/JA Grade and/or Vigilance Officer in Senior Scale/Junior Scale

Vigilance Inspectors

 

Annexure-1.3

Organisation of Vigilance Department in PSUs

Chief Vigilance Officer in SA Grade/SG

Joint General Manager/Vigilance or Deputy CVO/Vigilance or Deputy General Manager/Vigilance

Manager/Vigilance and/or Assistant Manager/Vigilance

 

Annexure-1.4

VIGILANCE SET-UP IN OTHER RAILWAY ORGANISATIONS ATTACHED TO ZONAL VIGILANCE

ZONAL RAILWAY

ATTACHED UNITS

Central Railway

Metropolitan Transport Project, Mumbai, Indian Railways Institute of Civil Engineering, Pune; Indian Railways Institute of Electrical Engineering, Nasik

Eastern Railway

RRB/Malda, Indian Railways Institute of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Jamalpur

Northern Railway

RRB/Chandigarh, RRB/Jammu Tawi, Indian Railways Institute of Transportation Management, Lucknow; National Rail Museum, New Delhi; Central Organisation for Modernization of Workshops (COFMOW), Indian Railways Organisation for Alternative Fuels, New Delhi

North Eastern Railway

RRB/Gorakhpur

Northeast Frontier Railway

RRB/Guwahati, General Manager (Const.)/ Guwahati.

Southern Railway

RRB/Chennai, RRB/Trivandrum, Metropolitan Transport Project, Chennai

South Central Railway

RRB/Secunderabad, Indian Railways Institute of Signal Engineering & Telecommunication, Secunderabad;

South Eastern Railway

RRB/Kolkata, RRB/Ranchi

South East Central Railway

RRB/Bilaspur

Western Railway

RRB/Ahmedabad, RRB/Mumbai, National Academy of Indian Railways, Vadodara

East Central Railway

RRB/Patna, RRB/Muzaffarpur

North Central Railway

RRB/Allahabad

West Central Railway

RRB/Bhopal

South Western Railway

RRB/Bangalore

East Coast Railway

RRB/Bhubaneshwar

North Western Railway

RRB/Ajmer 

NOTE: The complaints received/forwarded against officials of Workshop Projects should be investigated by the respective zones in which the projects are located and investigation reports sent to Board Vigilance for further processing along with the comments of the concerned CAO/Head of Organisation.


 

Annexure 1.5

D&G Charges in various Work Estimates

No 2017/E&R/3(2)/2 dated 11-7-2018

 

 

Annexure 1.6

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA

MINISTRY OF RAILWAYS

(RAILWAY BOARD)

Office Order No. 28 of 1997

Subject: Level and time limit for disposal of CA-iii references received by MR/ MOS(R)

Queries are being received by Chasing Cell from various officers and Branches regarding the level of disposal of CA-iii references addressed to Minister of Railways/Minister of State for Railways.

2. At present, the following categories are being marked by MR/MOS(R) Cell on the letters received in their respective Secretariats:-

Category - A

All Communications received from VIPs víz President of India, Vice-President of India, Governors, Central Ministers, Ministers from States, MPs, MLAs and Councillors

Category - B

Letters received from other VIPs like Ex-Central Ministers, Ex-Ministers from States and Ex-MPs etc.

Category - M

All communications on which MR/ MOS(R)'s remarks are made.

Category – C

Letters seen by PS to MOS ( R ) but not covered under A, B and M above

Category - O

All communications received in MR/MOS(R) Secretariat, but not covered under A, B, M and C above.

3. Draft replies or position in respect of communications marked Categories  “A” and “M” are to be put up to MR/ MOS ( R ) for consideration

4. Draft replies or position in respect of communications 'B' to be put up to MR/MOS(R) secretariat in the light of Office Order No. 52 of 1996.

5. Reference under Category 'C' and 'O' may be disposed of at the level of AMs/Executive Directors/Directors/Jt. Directors concerned, depending on the merits of the case.

6. As laid down under Office Order No. 23 of 1997, replies to the communications should be issued within 10 days where no information is required from the Railways, and within 15 days where information is required to be obtained from Railways.

7. Kindly ensure strict compliance of the above instructions.

(Prakash Gokhale)

Deputy Secretary (Parliament)

No. 88/CS/CDN/1799 - Dated 03.06.1997


 

201       VIGILANCE AGENCIES

Anti-corruption measures of the Central Government are responsibility of (i) the Central Vigilance Commission [hereinafter referred to as the Commission] (ii) Administrative Vigilance Division [AVD] in the Department of Personnel & Training; (iii) Central Bureau of Investigation [CBI]; (iv) Vigilance units in the Ministries/ Departments of Government of India, Central Public Sector Enterprises and other autonomous organisations [hereinafter referred to as Department]; (v) Disciplinary Authorities; and (vi) Supervisory Officers.

 

202       CENTRAL VIGILANCE COMMISSION

(a) Genesis: The Central Vigilance Commission was set up by the Government of India by a Resolution, dated 11.2.1964 in pursuance of the recommendations made by the Committee on Prevention of Corruption [popularly known as Santhanam Committee]. Further, it was in pursuance of the directions of the Hon’ble Supreme Court in the case of Vineet Narain vs. Union of India [CWP 340-343 of 1993] that the Commission was accorded statutory status with effect from 25.8.1998 through “The Central Vigilance Commission Ordinance, 1998”. It was followed by CVC (Amendment) Ordinance dated 27.10.1998, CVC Ordinance dated 8.01.1999, DoPT Resolution No. 371/20/99-AVD-III dated 04.04.1999 and DoPT Resolution No. 371/20/99-AVD-III dated 13.08.2002, while the CVC Bill was under the consideration of the Parliament. Subsequently, the CVC Bill was passed by both Houses of Parliament in 2003 and the President gave assent on 11th September 2003. Thus, the Central Vigilance Commission Act, 2003 (No.45 of 2003) came into effect from that date.